"These swords do not discriminate against age,
     gender, race, religion or social economic status."


    Our fencing group offers foil, epee, and saber instruction.
    We welcome both newcomers to the sport and experienced
    competitors.

    Three weapons -- the foil, the sabre, and the épée -- are used in
    fencing, and there are individual and team competitions for each.
    Foil and épée are "point thrusting" weapons, while the sabre can
    both thrust and slash with its blade edge. All three weapons have
    been modified to allow for electronic scoring. All fencers wear
    protective masks and clothes.

    Foil
    The foil has a flexible rectangular blade, approximately 35 inches
    long. Points are scored with the tip of the blade and must land
    within the torso of the body. The valid target area in foil is the
    torso, from the shoulders to the groin, front and back (or chest
    and stomach cavity). It does not include the arms, head or legs.

    The foil fencer's uniform includes a metallic vest (called a lamé)
    which covers the valid target area, so that a valid touch will
    register as a colored light. A tip is attached to the point of the
    foil and is connected to a wire inside the blade. The fencer
    wears a cord inside his uniform which connects the foil to a wire,
    connected to the scoring machine.

    There are two scoring lights on the machine. One shows a green
    light when a fencer is hit the other shows a red light when their
    opponent is hit. A touch landing off the valid target area
    (that which is not covered by the lamé) is indicated by a white
    light. These "off target" hits do not count as a point, but they
    do stop the fencing action.

    One of the most difficult things to understand in foil is
    the rule of right-of-way. This rule was established to teach
    swordsmen how to stay alive in a duel.  "Right-of-way" is the
    differentiation of offense and defense, made by the referee.
    The difference is important only when two lights go on at the
    same time in foil. When this happens, the winner of the point is
    the one who the referee determined had the right to the attack
    at the time the lights lit. This is determined in two ways either
    the first two attack or the last to fail. If one person fails the other
    takes over as the attacker.

    Epee
    The epee (pronounced "EPP-pay"), is similar in length to the foil,
    but is heavier, weighing approximately 27 ounces, with a larger
    guard (to protect the hand from a valid hit) and a much stiffer
    blade. Touches are scored only with the point of the blade.
    The entire body is the valid target area.

    Epee does not use the right-of-way instead it is the weapon of
    timing control, the first person to get the touch earns the point.
    Or, if both fencers hit within 1/25th of a second of each other,
    both earn a point. The blade is wired with a tip at the end that
    completes an electrical circuit when it is depressed beyond a
    pressure of 750 grams. This causes the colored bulb on the
    scoring machine to light.

    Sabre
    The sabre is the modern version of the slashing cavalry sword,
    and is similar in length and weight to the foil. The major
    difference is that the sabre is a thrusting weapon as well as a
    cutting weapon (use of the blade). The target area is from the
    bend of the hips (both front and back), to the top of the head,
    simulating the cavalry rider on a horse.

    The sabre fencer's uniform includes a metallic mask, metallic
    jacket (lamé) and lame glove, which covers the target area to
    register a valid touch on the scoring machine. Just as in foil,
    there are two scoring lights on the machine. One shows a green
    light when a fencer is hit the other shows a red light when their
    opponent is hit. There is no off target in saber.

    As with foil, one of the most difficult things to understand in
    saber is the rule of right-of-way. "Right-of-way" is the
    differentiation of offense and defense, made by the referee.
    The difference is important only when two lights go on at the
    same time in foil. When this happens, the winner of the point
    is the one who the referee determined had the right to the
    attack at the time the lights lit. This is determined in two ways
    either the first two attack or the last to fail. If one person fails the
    other takes over as the attacker.
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Member of the United States Fencing Association

Out of Nowhere Fencing boasts members in the Virginia Division,  USFA and Maryland Division, USFA.

Students compete in regional competitions, Junior Olympics and USA Fencing National
Championships.

Coach David Copeland is a registered professional member with the United States Fencing
Association.

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